“I fall in love with almost every person I photograph. I want to hear their stories. I want to get close. This is personal for me.”
— Stephanie Sinclair, from the exhibit “The Power of Photography: National Geographic 125 Years” at the Annenberg Space for Photography
“We are all students and stumblers by nature”
— Jason Lazarus at the CJM 11.21.13
“With a stroke of my brush, I made the tears I shed disappear. I can change day to night and paint heaven while in hell. Not even in my present incarceration can my mind be enslaved.”

Mwasi Fuui, artist, San Quentin Prison Arts Project

On View at the Main Library, SFPL through September 1, 2013

ABSOLUT’s Open Canvas initiative hits San Francisco
On Saturday, August 24, more than 20 artists literally painted the town (or at least part of it) as part of ABSOLUTE Vodka’s public arts project.  Divisadero Street between Grove and Hayes was first painted white, and then was brought back to life by large scale murals and site-specifical installations by these artists.  
I had very high expectations for this project and when my sister and I showed up Sunday we realized there was one slight problem: how do you tell “normal San Francisco” from an art installation?  The ladders and painters in front of one building were a dead give away, but as for the rest of the buildings on the street we couldn’t tell what was new and what was pre-existing color and pattern.  It’s a bit ironic that this art-installation was installed in an already vibrant/colorful City, but it’s a neat concept! (It also acts as a memory game of sorts for those who frequent Divisadero to try to decide what buildings got a face lift and what remains in its original state)
On view through September 1st ABSOLUT’s Open Canvas initiative hits San Francisco
On Saturday, August 24, more than 20 artists literally painted the town (or at least part of it) as part of ABSOLUTE Vodka’s public arts project.  Divisadero Street between Grove and Hayes was first painted white, and then was brought back to life by large scale murals and site-specifical installations by these artists.  
I had very high expectations for this project and when my sister and I showed up Sunday we realized there was one slight problem: how do you tell “normal San Francisco” from an art installation?  The ladders and painters in front of one building were a dead give away, but as for the rest of the buildings on the street we couldn’t tell what was new and what was pre-existing color and pattern.  It’s a bit ironic that this art-installation was installed in an already vibrant/colorful City, but it’s a neat concept! (It also acts as a memory game of sorts for those who frequent Divisadero to try to decide what buildings got a face lift and what remains in its original state)
On view through September 1st

ABSOLUT’s Open Canvas initiative hits San Francisco

On Saturday, August 24, more than 20 artists literally painted the town (or at least part of it) as part of ABSOLUTE Vodka’s public arts project.  Divisadero Street between Grove and Hayes was first painted white, and then was brought back to life by large scale murals and site-specifical installations by these artists.  

I had very high expectations for this project and when my sister and I showed up Sunday we realized there was one slight problem: how do you tell “normal San Francisco” from an art installation?  The ladders and painters in front of one building were a dead give away, but as for the rest of the buildings on the street we couldn’t tell what was new and what was pre-existing color and pattern.  It’s a bit ironic that this art-installation was installed in an already vibrant/colorful City, but it’s a neat concept! (It also acts as a memory game of sorts for those who frequent Divisadero to try to decide what buildings got a face lift and what remains in its original state)

On view through September 1st

On the Line: Artwork from San Quentin Prison Arts Program
A wonderful show full of great talent.  Media ranges from painting to mixed media to screen prints to  dioramas.  Aside from the innate political quality in all the works, the most striking element to me was the poetic nature of the wall labels written by the artists.  
"These lost souls of our society are treated as strange fruit.  I am only an artist—a creative tool to express feelings and breathe life into these precious human beings of our universe with my creative gift and paint brush," artist Ronnie Goodman says of his piece, Homeless State Prison (2013) pictured above.
In the unpredictable chaos that often occurs in the Main Library, it was nice to take a break into the peace of their basement gallery to reflect, learn and appreciate the variety of human experiences.
Through September 1, 2013 at the Main Library, San Francisco Public Library

On the Line: Artwork from San Quentin Prison Arts Program

A wonderful show full of great talent.  Media ranges from painting to mixed media to screen prints to  dioramas.  Aside from the innate political quality in all the works, the most striking element to me was the poetic nature of the wall labels written by the artists.  

"These lost souls of our society are treated as strange fruit.  I am only an artist—a creative tool to express feelings and breathe life into these precious human beings of our universe with my creative gift and paint brush," artist Ronnie Goodman says of his piece, Homeless State Prison (2013) pictured above.

In the unpredictable chaos that often occurs in the Main Library, it was nice to take a break into the peace of their basement gallery to reflect, learn and appreciate the variety of human experiences.

Through September 1, 2013 at the Main Library, San Francisco Public Library

“Like art, religion has been an attempt to find meaning and value in life, despite the suffering that flesh is heir to.”
— Karen Armstrong, British author and former nun (from “Beyond Belief: 100 Years of the Spiritual in Modern Art” at the CJM)
One of my favorite works in the Contemporary Jewish Museum/SFMOMA exhibit, “Beyond Belief: 100 Years of the Spiritual in Modern Art” was Kiki Smith’s Lilith.  It sticks out, literally and figuratively, because of its unconventional display.  Lilith is part wall piece, part free standing sculpture…the only catch is she stands on a wall defying gravity.  There is a sense of power, strength and sturdiness to the piece because of Lilith’s angular, crouched pose.  
When I circled back around to take one last look at Lilith before leaving, I noticed a new feature of the sculpture.  Since she is perched on a wall at eye-level, the viewer can walk around to see her entire body.  This second look made me realize Lilith was looking back.  Her face is inlaid with very life-like looking glass eyes. They’re a little unnerving, a little off-putting. Lilith still commands my attention, just now in a mix of admiration and repulsion all in one.  All that with just her eyes…now that’s power. One of my favorite works in the Contemporary Jewish Museum/SFMOMA exhibit, “Beyond Belief: 100 Years of the Spiritual in Modern Art” was Kiki Smith’s Lilith.  It sticks out, literally and figuratively, because of its unconventional display.  Lilith is part wall piece, part free standing sculpture…the only catch is she stands on a wall defying gravity.  There is a sense of power, strength and sturdiness to the piece because of Lilith’s angular, crouched pose.  
When I circled back around to take one last look at Lilith before leaving, I noticed a new feature of the sculpture.  Since she is perched on a wall at eye-level, the viewer can walk around to see her entire body.  This second look made me realize Lilith was looking back.  Her face is inlaid with very life-like looking glass eyes. They’re a little unnerving, a little off-putting. Lilith still commands my attention, just now in a mix of admiration and repulsion all in one.  All that with just her eyes…now that’s power.

One of my favorite works in the Contemporary Jewish Museum/SFMOMA exhibit, “Beyond Belief: 100 Years of the Spiritual in Modern Art” was Kiki Smith’s Lilith.  It sticks out, literally and figuratively, because of its unconventional display.  Lilith is part wall piece, part free standing sculpture…the only catch is she stands on a wall defying gravity.  There is a sense of power, strength and sturdiness to the piece because of Lilith’s angular, crouched pose.  

When I circled back around to take one last look at Lilith before leaving, I noticed a new feature of the sculpture.  Since she is perched on a wall at eye-level, the viewer can walk around to see her entire body.  This second look made me realize Lilith was looking back.  Her face is inlaid with very life-like looking glass eyes. They’re a little unnerving, a little off-putting. Lilith still commands my attention, just now in a mix of admiration and repulsion all in one.  All that with just her eyes…now that’s power.

Teresita Fernández’s “Fire at the Contemporary Jewish Museum as part of the SFMOMA/CJM collaborative show, “Beyond Belief: 100 Years of the Spiritual in Modern Art.”

I have never been one to be celebrity-obsessed or star-struck (and am still puzzled at the appeal of an autograph), but I have a frighteningly similar reaction to a tween “Beliber” whenever I see a famous/favorite work of art in person.  Case in point, my art-geek-gasp and mini freak-out upon turning the corner at LACMA to see Miss Barbara Kruger’s famed Untitled (Your Body is a Battleground).